Error code 0xa00f4243 for Camera app on Windows 10

Windows 10 offers a UWP app for Camera. You can use it to take pictures and make videos. However, if you are facing Error code 0xa00f4243 for Camera UWP App, then its probably because or driver or third-party software issue.

Here is what the error code for the Camera UWP App says:

Close other apps. It looks as though another app is already using the camera. If you need it, here’s the error code: 0xA00F4243 (0xC00D3704)

Error code 0xa00f4243 for Camera app on Windows 10

Error code 0xa00f4243 for Camera App

The following fixes should be effective in fixing the error code 0xa00f4243 for Camera UWP App on Windows 10-

  1. Use Windows Store App Troubleshooter
  2. Reinstall the driver
  3. Use the Registry Editor
  4. Check the Windows Services
  5. Use System File Checker
  6. Enable Camera using Hardware key (if applicable)

The error message is obvious. The camera is being used by another application in Windows 10. So do check if thats the case, and close the app. Then relaunch the Camera App, and it should work. In case it still doesn’t work, let’s take a look at more solutions.

1] Use Windows Store App Troubleshooter

Open the Settings App on Windows 10. Navigate to the following location – Update & Security > Troubleshoot.

On the right side panel, you will find several Troubleshooters. You need to run the Windows Store Apps Troubleshooter.

Windows Store troubleshooter

Follow the on-screen instructions for each and check if the error 0xA00F4243 (0xC00D3704) is gone for good.

2] Reinstall the driver

You need to either reinstall or rollback the driver listed under the section of Camera in the Device Manager. If you just updated any driver, and the problem started after that you need to rollback the driver. If you did not, then updating this device driver to its latest version should help.

Camera Drivers Device Manager

Since this is a Universal app, you can download the latest version of your drivers for Windows 10 by following the link. Sometimes the Camera resource is stuck, and reinstalling drivers frees it up.

3] Use the Registry Editor

Here we will edit a Registry key- EnableFrameServerMode. It works for Windows 10 64-bit version only, so skip if you are using a 32-bit. Windows Camera Frame Server is a service in Windows 10. It captures the video from a camera, decode it and send it to apps.

Open the Run prompt (WINKEY + R), type regedit and hit Enter.

Once Registry Editor opens, navigate to the following key-

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Microsoft\Windows Media Foundation\Platform

Frame Server Mode Registry Settings

Right-click on the free space and select New > DWORD (32-bit) Value.

Name it as EnableFrameServerMode.

Double click on it and set its Value data to be 0.

Click on OK.

Reboot your computer for the changes to take effect.

4] Check the Windows Services

Type, services.msc in the Start search box and press Enter to open the Windows Services Manager.

Locate Intel(R) RealSense(TM) Depth, and then double-click on it to open its Properties box.

Change its Startup Type to be AutomaticAnd make sure that it is running.

Click Apply and then reboot your computer for the changes to take effect, and then see if this has helped make the error go away.

This applies to only selected computers which have Intel Hardware for the camera.

5] Run System File Checker

Open Command Prompt as administrator. Then execute the command to run System File Checker.

sfc /scannow

Restart your system after the scan is complete.

6] Enable Camera using Hardware key (if applicable)

If your computer has a dedicated hardware key or enables or disable the camera, try pressing it and check if that fixes your issues. This hardware key is installed on many computers nowadays to ensure the user’s privacy.

I hope these fixes helped you to fix the camera reserved or blocked by another app situation on Windows 10.

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Ayush has been a Windows enthusiast since the day he got his first PC with Windows 98SE. He is an active Windows Insider since Day 1 and is now a Windows Insider MVP. He has been testing pre-release services on his Windows 10 PC, Lumia, and Android devices.