Windows 10 Blue Screen Troubleshooters from Microsoft

Troubleshooting Windows Stop Errors or Blue Screens has never been an easy job. You usually check your hardware, update device drivers, maybe do a few other things and hope things work out. Apart from including the Blue Screen Troubleshooter in Windows 10, Microsoft has launched a web page that helps beginners & novice users troubleshoot their Blue Screens on Windows 10. The built-in Blue Screen Troubleshooter is easy to run and fixes BSODs automatically. The online Windows 10 Blue Screen Troubleshooter from Microsoft is a wizard that is meant to help novice users fix their Stop Errors. It offers helpful links along the way.

Windows 10 Blue Screen Troubleshooter

1] Microsoft Online Blue Screen Troubleshooter

Windows 10 Blue Screen Troubleshooter

Blue Screens in Windows 10 are simple and do not display Stop Error information. So if you want to get the error code, you may have to force Windows 10 to display Stop Error details.

Having done this, visit the Microsoft site to get started. You will see a simple wizard that will walk you through the process of troubleshooting Blue Screens.

You will first be asked – When did you get the blue screen error?

  1. While upgrading to Windows 10
  2. After an update was installed
  3. While using my PC.

Select your option.

If you select While upgrading to Windows 10, you will now be asked to go back to your previous version of Windows, of the setup already does not do so automatically.

If you select After an update was installed, you will be asked to check for updates or remove newly installed hardware.

If you select While using my PC, you will be offered some helpful suggestions if you can get to your desktop, as well as, if you are unable to access the desktop.

The troubleshooter is pretty basic and is meant to assist a user move forward in this onerous task of fixing your Blue Screen error.

2] Built-in Blue Screen Troubleshooter

In Windows 10 you can access the Blue Screen Troubleshooter via Settings > Update & Security > Troubleshoot.

windows 10 blue screen troubleshooter

Run it and see if it can fix your problem.

The troubleshooter queries the event messages of the last week & interprets the bugcheck codes, and checks if it was caused by:

  1. Device drivers
  2. Faulty hardware or Disk drive
  3. Memory failure
  4. Windows Services
  5. Malware.

UPDATE: The built-in Blue Screen troubleshooter is no longer available starting with Windows 10 v1809. You may use the online Troubleshooter.

If this does not help you, there are some more tips to help you fix Blue Screen of Death in Windows 10 under different scenarios. If you need more detailed help, check out this detailed BSOD guide.

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Posted by on , in Category Windows with Tags
Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP Awardee in Windows (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

3 Comments

  1. ReadandShare

    I’ve been using Win 10 for six months now. Never once got a blue screen. But I’ve had the OS crash/reboot on me a couple of times already. 🙁

  2. MmeMoxie

    In all honesty, Windows crashing and rebooting has happened in all versions of Windows. So far, I haven’t had this happen, in a long time. Trust me, Win 95 and Win 98 were famous for crashing and rebooting. I hated the Blue Screen of Death. Many times, back then, it meant that I had to re-install Windows all over, again. I think I got a Blue Screen once with Win 7 Pro. Right now, I have Win 10 Pro. When, I started using the Windows Pro version, I saw less and less of the BSOD. I use the NTFS file format and that seem to give me a good, solid version.

  3. MmeMoxie

    Andy, it is always good to know what to do, when you are in “trouble.” Sounds like Microsoft is really trying to help those who use Windows. I am still wary though. MS doesn’t have a good track record. Hopefully, with the Win 10 versions this will change.

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