How to disable Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows 10

When a critical error is encountered by the Windows operating system, the system throws a Blue Screen of Death (BSOD). This Blue Screen of Death then throws in the error code on the bottom left region and then reboots the computer. This error is mainly caused due to the fact that some internal system processes or files have stopped working as expected. Sometimes, a DLL or Dynamic Link Library files have malfunctioned or any critical process inside of the system has returned an error. Well, in this case, many times the task that the user is currently performing is left and closed forcibly by the system. This implies a greater loss of unsaved work by the user on their computer. Hence, to fix this we need to disable Automatic Restarts.

Disable Automatic Restart on System Failure

First of all, we would recommend you to create a System Restore point. Because we will be playing with registry files and modifying some really critical Windows settings. Having done this, we will continue on our quest of disabling Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows 10.

1: Using Startup and Recovery Settings

First of all, start by hitting they WIN + R combination to launch the Run utility.

Now, type in sysdm.cpl and then hit Enter to launch System Properties. Next, click on the tab called Advanced and under the section labeled as Startup and Recovery, click on the button that says Settings.

How to disable Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows 10

A new pop-up window will now open. Under the section called System failure, uncheck the option labeled as Automatically restart.

Now, click on OK then on Apply and then again on OK.

Reboot your computer now for the changes to take an effect.

2: Using Command Prompt with Admin Level Privileges

Start by pressing WIN + X button combo or right-click on the Start button and click on Command Prompt (Admin) or just search for cmd in the Cortana search box, right click on the Command Prompt icon and click on Run as Administrator.

Now, type in the following command to disable Automatic Restart on System Failure:

Disable Automatic Restart on System Failure: wmic recoveros set AutoReboot = False

Or, you can type in the following command to enable Automatic Restart on System Failure:

Disable Automatic Restart on System Failure: wmic recoveros set AutoReboot = True

Type in exit and hit Enter to exit the Command Prompt.

Reboot your computer for the changes to take an effect.

3: Using the Registry Editor

First of all, start by hitting the WINKEY + R button combination to launch the Run utility.

Now type in regedit and hit Enter.

Or, you can search for Registry Editor in the Cortana Search box and select the appropriate option.

Click on Yes for the UAC prompt that you get.

Now, navigate to the following key location inside of the Registry Editor,

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CrashControl

Select CrashControl in the left pane and then double click on AutoReboot on the right pane.

Now, a new mini-window will pop-up. Inside the Value Data field, enter the value as 0 (ZERO). Click on OK.

Reboot your computer for the changes to take an effect.

4: Using Advanced Startup Options

Start by booting in the Advanced Startup Options. You can learn more about booting in the Advanced Startup Options here in this article.

Now, after you are booted in the Advanced Startup Options, click on Troubleshoot.

Then out of the three options you get, click on Advanced Options.

Automatic Repair couldn't repair your PC

After that, click on Startup Settings. Then, click on the button labeled as Restart.

After the restart, the system will boot into Startup Settings, just hit the F9 key or key in order to select the option to Disable Automatic Restart after failure.

Cheers!

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Ayush has been a Windows enthusiast since the day he got his first PC with Windows 98SE. He is an active Windows Insider since Day 1 and is now a Windows Insider MVP. He has been testing pre-release services on his Windows 10 PC, Lumia, and Android devices.