Microsoft Scams: Identify & avoid scams that fraudulently use the Microsoft name

12 Comments

  1. People please, what the author was too kind to say here was this. Don’t be so freaking dumb and greedy. How can you ‘win’ a lottery if you never played it? If’t its too good to be true it is!!!!!!!! Since when do service people call you!?. Ever try getting one on the phone in a 24hr time frame much less they call you before you need them? It’s all about greed on both ends.

  2. The article was good HOWEVER, …it gave me pause when I came across the typo, I presume, below. You might consider taking a moment to proof your text prior to publishing. If you don’t believe you have time, zap them to me via email and I’d be pleased to proof for you.

    Please do keep the tips coming.

    You can learn to recognize a scam by acquainting yourself with some of the telltale signs.

    1. Misspellings or bad grammar
    2. Threats of account closures
    3. Deals that appear to be good and true and not fraudulent and lastly,
    4. Requests to make donations
    5. Hang up if someone from “Microsoft Tech Support” calls to fix your computer
    6. Microsoft doe not make any phone calls to fix your computer.

    I don’t believe Microsoft uses dear regardless of how cuddly they believe they might be.

  3. I just had a bad download where a thing called Microsoft Sweet Packs got installed, even after I got rid of the bug with Malwarebytes, I still had 3 deletions in my programsI had to uninstall, and I just reset to LAST WEEK and the SweetPack Search STILL comes up next to my google search, luckily google preventet from taking over as main search,, but its still there,,, It was a cnet free download, and Im always very careful about ad ware but it was Microsoft,, BEWARE,,, SweetPack is BAD.

  4. I don’t think that Microsoft uses DEAR either. However, they could use DEER, which are cuddly; as in DOE, a DEER.
    You might consider taking a moment to proof your text prior to publishing.

  5. I love to mess with the people from “Windows Technical Support
    Department,” or whatever they are calling themselves. It seems to
    differ each time they call. Anyway, this is what happened the last time
    they called…

    Scammer: Madame, it is very important that you
    do exactly as I tell you or else your computer will continue spreading a
    very dangerous infection —

    Me: I would love to, but I can’t. I don’t even own a computer.
    —–
    All
    things considered, being tech savvy means knowing what your system is
    doing, why your system is doing it, and when to end the phone call that
    could ruin it.

    The one time Microsoft Technical Support called me was to follow up on an issue I was having with software installation, with my permission, as I had initiated contact. The call came at the pre-arranged time, the Caller ID was visible, and the correct case number was referenced.

    Also, notice the name difference: Microsoft Technical Support vs. Windows Technical Support Department.

    Thank you for letting me participate in your comment forum.

    Sincerely,
    Ms. Debby Hanoka
    USA

  6. I am one of your customers.I’m not happy for your unfair support.
    Microsoft’s assistance isn’t free.

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