Office 2013 & Office 365: Licensing, installation, transferability explained

Reacting quickly to reports that the Office 2013 license was tied to the first PC that it gets installed on, Microsoft, to put things in the right perspective, has thought it prudent to issue clarifications about Office 2013 and Office 365 licensing, its installation and its transferability.

office-2013-365-licensing

This is how  Office 2010 and Office 2013 licenses compare:

  1. The Office 2013 software is licensed to one computer for the life of that computer and is non-transferable (consistent with the rights and restrictions of Office 2010 PKC). If a customer buys the Office 2013 software and installs it on a PC that fails under warranty, the customer can contact support to receive an exemption to activate the Office 2013 software on the replacement PC.
  2. Office 365 Home Premium works across up to 5 devices (Windows tablets, PCs or Macs) and can be activated and deactivated across devices.
  3. Office 365 University works across 2 devices (Windows tablets, PCs or Macs) and can be activated and deactivated across devices.

It is important to note that Office 2013 suites have consistent rights and restrictions regarding transferability as the equivalent Office 2010 PKC, which was chosen by a majority of Office 2010 customers worldwide says Microsoft.

Hope this clarifies the issues regarding transferability of Office licenses. You may check out the Microsoft Office 2013 & Office 365 editions & pricing here.

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Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP Awardee in Windows (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

2 Comments

  1. TimeForLibreOffice1

    This is more M$ baloney – M$ is citing status of licensing for FPP and PKC that are completely at variance with user experience. How many people know they are using O2010 FPP as opposed to O2010 PKC? (those that arn’t still using the best release, Office 2003 Professional/Standard) I’ve been using Office in the various releases for more than a decade and I’ve NEVER seen any licensing level identified as either PFF or PKC. Office Professional Plus, Office Standard, Office Progfessional and Enterprise, yes, I recongnize those differently licensed product. But no, never ever heard of Office FFP or PKC.
    There is nothing there to compare with what M$ has done to licensing for Office 2013 (except lie about it in the face of customer revolt)

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