The Windows Club

OpenShot for Windows makes it easier to edit videos for YouTube, Facebook, etc.

Video editing is done my millions around the world, especially for such things as uploading content to YouTube and other places on the web. For these tasks, many might believe they will need a paid software to edit their content, but such is not the case.

You see, there are several free video editing programs available on the web, many of which are able to stand toe-to-toe with their paid counterpart. Today, we’re going to talk about a free video editing program known as OpenShot to see if it is worth your time.

OpenShot Video Editor

The thing we like about OpenShot is that it comes with many features, yet still manages to keep things relatively simple. Usually, such a dynamic is only found in paid software, so to see a free program with all the necessary usability components tacked on, it makes us feel all woozy inside.

The first thing users will notice about OpenShot is the main window. It has a tabbed section where editors can use to play around with different videos at the same time. When a file is selected for use, it appears in the upper-left corner of the user interface. We can also add them to the timeline that is situated at the lower section of the window.

On the right-side sits a preview window, this is where users get to preview their work before adding the finishing touches.

When it comes down to viewing files, OpenShot only makes it possible to view images, audio, and video files at a time. However, it is possible to view all files at the same time.

In terms of adding files, this was quite easy because all we needed to do was drag-and-drop files to the project area then begin the work. Once a video file has been added to the timeline, users can then go ahead and add special effects by going to the “Effects” tab. To add an effect, just drag-and-drop.

It is also possible to zoom in and out of files located in the timeline, but it all depends on what you want to do. For example, we’d zoom in if we wanted to align files much better since this is important when it comes down to mixing video and audio files.

We should point out that OpenShot makes it possible to choose between 3D and static files. To take advantage of 3D animations, the developers integrated the program with Blender 3D and Inkscape.

Whether you’re more interested in creating video content for YouTube, Facebook, or even something for school, OpenShot is more than capable of helping you get the job done. It’s easy to use and supports most video and audio formats, a big plus in our eyes.

Download the Open Source cross-platform OpenShot video editor from the official website right here.