How to Enable Offline Access to Google Drive Documents on your Windows PC

Google Drive v1.9 for Windows brings a new feature to Google Drive – Offline access along with some bug fixes. As you might have guessed, the feature allows offline access to Google Documents from Google Drive website. However, there are 2 pre-requisites,

  • You should be running Chrome browser
  • You must have Google Drive client already installed on your system.

The second condition ensures a Google Drive folder is created on your computer. Files from Google Drive on the web including Google Docs files, will sync to the folder.

google drive folder

 

When you install the Google Drive client on your system a small Drive icon should become visible on the taskbar.

Drive icon

If these 2 conditions are met, you can have offline access to your most recent Google documents stored on drive.google.com. This means you can open and edit Google documents from drive folder and the changes made will be synced automatically when internet connection is established. This can help you save both, time and efforts even during long hours of power cuts.

Enable Offline Access to Google Drive Documents

There are following steps involved,

  • Visiting Google Drive website by entering the following address in Chrome address bar – drive.google.com. Then, sign in with your username and password.

Google Drive sign in

  • Clicking the drop-down arrow of ‘More’ button in the left panel and selecting ‘Offline’.

Offline button

  •  The action when taken will request you to install the Drive Chrome web app to access your stuff offline. We already have it installed so we can skip this step and proceed further.

Google Drive Client

  • Hit ‘Enable Offline’ button for enabling offline editing. Once done, the feature will enable offline access to Google Drive on PC . You will get the rights for editing Google documents offline as the documents will be saved to your computer.

Enable offline

Any changes made to files will be synced when internet connection is restored.

files

 

That’s it!

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The author Hemant Saxena is a post-graduate in bio-technology and has an immense interest in following Windows, Office and other technology developments. Quiet by nature, he is an avid Lacrosse player. Creating a System Restore Point first before installing a new software, and being careful about any third-party offers while installing freeware is recommended.